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There was more of it (in a bad way) on the fifth night of the Creative Arts Emmys.

On Saturday night, die-hard TV fans ventured into the fifth and sixth hours of this week's Creative Arts Emmy Awards programming to be greeted by many things they'd seen before.

However, the winners were brand new with 31 prizes in 30 categories for 24 different projects. This is proof of the quality of television that has been created across the board.

Unfortunately, the ceremony that aired on FXX didn't quite match what today's night’s nominees and winners deserved, as discussed in more detail here. What it did offer, however, is an oversized amount of snubs and surprises that need to be discussed right away.

Surprise: transphobia!

Oh, this isn't a fun way to start on today's list, but it's inevitable, all things considered. One of the night's biggest winners, which won three awards on NBC's Saturday Night Live, was Netflix's stand-up comedy special, Dave Chappelle: Sticks & Stones.

connected

connected

"Sticks & Stones" has been controversial since it debuted on Netflix in August 2019 as many of the people Chappelle targeted with his humor, including the LGBTQ community, particularly transgender people, the #MeToo movement and the men accused Michael Jackson on sexual abuse and the "culture of abandonment" that dares to hold people, especially those with privileges, power and / or wealth, accountable for their words.

Of course, this abandonment culture argument isn't quite as effective if you end up winning two Emmys for your deliberately cruel, homophobic, and misogynistic humor.

As if that wasn't enough, the presenter and star of Disney + "The Mandalorian", Gina Carano, also returned in a pre-recorded segment on Saturday night. The actress this week invited the disdain of some internet users to include mocking nonsense words in her Twitter bio in place of preferred pronouns, an act often taken by cisgender people to support and show solidarity with the transgender and non-binary community to show them.

What apparently started as a badly advised joke turned into an argument between Carano and fans about how downtrodden she felt, suggesting that the real bad guy in her story was everyone else.

Regardless, great show TV Academy. Way to show solidarity for marginalized communities!

"The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance"

Netflix

Snub: "Star Wars Resistance"

Detail-minded readers may notice that I talked about 31 awards in 30 categories in the intro and that there was a tie in the Outstanding Children's Program category during the ceremony on Saturday. Netflix's "Jim Henson's The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance" and HBO's "We Are The Dream: The Children of Oakland MLK Oratorical Fest" were both announced as winners in that category.

Unfortunately, there were only three nominees for the children's program in the competition, which means that Disney's “Star Wars Resistance” was the only non-winner in this category tonight. It's kind of crap.

Surprise: even more Maya Rudolph Love

Sometimes surprises are shocking and sometimes just delightful. Maya Rudolph received a second Emmy win on Saturday, this time as Outstanding Guest Actress on a Comedy Series for her work on Saturday Night Live, specifically as Democratic Vice-Presidential Candidate Senator Kamala Harris.

She faced remarkably fierce competition in the Comedy Guest category, including Angela Bassett, Bette Midler, Wanda Sykes, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, and indeed herself for her work on NBC's "The Good Place".

Rudolph won her first Emmy earlier this week for her voice-over work on Netflix's "Big Mouth".

Hunter Schafer Jules

"Euphoria"

HBO

Snub: The music from HBO Dramas

Listen. No shadow of Ludwig Göransson, who won Outstanding Music Composition for a series for his work on “The Mandalorian” – nothing but love for a guy who had his big break on television for composing in NBC's “Community” and worked closely with him has been Ryan Coogler for a decade – but the dramatic results of "Succession" and "Euphoria" that year have both been exceptional. Could this be a sign of a big “Mandalorian” surprise on Sunday evening? We will see.

Surprise: Michael Jordan's Chicago Bulls are unbeatable

At the ceremony it was unclear which competitor in the "Outstanding Documentary" or "Nonfiction" series had the upper hand. After Monday night's awards, Emmy voters' love affair with Netflix's "Tiger King" seemed to have cooled, but a natural successor had yet to be suggested.

And in the end, it was one of the most apex predators in sports history that rose to the top. ESPN's "The Last Dance," which explored not only the life and legacy of Michael Jordan, but also the arc of the Chicago Bulls during the Jordan era and the pursuit of Jordan and his team for a final championship during the 1997-98 NBA season .

Jason Hehir's "Last Dance", due to be released two months earlier than planned because of the pandemic and fan enthusiasm, was always destined for greatness, just like Jordan. We should never have doubted it.

Snub: New content

Anyone familiar with previous snubs and surprise updates will know that the TV Academy has been reusing segments night after night – sometimes every night – throughout the week, much to the despair of those watching on the reg.

As the ceremony made the leap from online to broadcast, some people I spoke to thought that Saturday's presentation might be a departure from the rest of the week's offerings. In reality, they couldn't have been more wrong.

Saturday, with its 30 categories, was simply an expanded version of an event many of us had seen four times before, full of segments and moderators that had been featured several times.

This may not have been the best way to give away the Creative Arts Emmys this year.

Surprise: old problems are new problems

In large part because if you are merely recycling content from previous episodes, it means that some things that were problems before will become problems again.

On Saturday we were presented with another largely nonsensical memoriam and the return of Chris Hardwick, whose presence earlier in the week was controversial and whose return was even less appreciated.

Not good.

"Guardian"

Mark Hill / HBO

Snub: Emmy forecast

But if there was one real loser to emerge from last night of the Creative Arts Emmy Awards, it was those of us who helped predict the awards. Not only are Netflix and HBO represented with 19 pieces in the awards ceremony, the picture in relation to the comedy and drama races does not seem very clear.

In the drama series, the smart money was on "Succession" with competitors in "The Crown", "Ozark" and "The Mandalorian". "Succession" had a solid week with three awards, while "The Crown" won two and "Ozark" is currently without a win.

"The Mandalorian" currently has the most awards at seven, but keep in mind that there is only one nomination for tomorrow night's ceremony: Drama Series. "Succession" has 10. "Die Krone" has six. "Ozark" has nine. It's really everyone's game.

Things in comedy run almost as close between the two strongest competitors. Amazon Prime TV's "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" put on a softer show at the Creative Arts Emmys than in previous years, winning four awards, while Pop TV's underdog "Schitt & # 39; s Creek" has two. Both series still have eight nominations for the Sunday ceremony.

Thankfully, we still have the dominance of HBO's “Watchmen,” VH1's “RuPaul & # 39; s Drag Race,” and NBC's “Saturday Night Live,” which we can count on.

Thursday 17th September

"Schitt & # 39; s Creek"

Pop TV

Phew Congratulations, we've made it through four full Creative Arts Emmy Awards ceremonies and can finally reach the main stage by which I mean FXX. On Thursday night, the Television Academy's final streaming ceremony took place, which included Scripted Programming: Part Deux and included a number of categories related to animation, short form content, music and more.

After we all have Friday off, the Creative Arts Emmys will conclude on Saturday with a ceremony on FXX where they will prepare the pump for the Primetime Emmy Awards on ABC the following evening.

As for the winners, voters have spread love widely. Twelve different productions received trophies from the 14 categories, with only Netflix's “Big Mouth” and Quibi's “#FreeRayshawn” each receiving two awards.

The Television Academy also honored the judged category winners at the event. A full list of 2020 Emmy recipients judged can be found here.

But even if the Emmys spread the love, there are still plenty of snubs and surprises around. Here are just a few:

Surprise: Quibi apparently

Look, I'm just as surprised as anyone. But here we are, six months after the quarantine, and Quibi has now won two Emmys together. Do you know how many Emmys there are? That's as many Emmys as Game of Thrones won in its first season. (Acceptable alternate answer: "Two Emmys more than Apple TV + won." Unacceptable alternate answer: "Two Emmys more than HBO's" The Leftovers "won.")

Both Laurence Fishburne and Jasmine Cephas Jones won Emmys for their appearances on #FreeRayshawn, which would apparently make it the front runner for outstanding short-form comedy or drama series unless it was not nominated. (We'll talk about the show that won a little later.)

Anyway, great job Quibi. They had four nominees in each acting category and could win both. That has to count for something.

Surprise: Emmy Winner Series "Schitt & # 39; s Creek"

Less surprising, more inevitable, Pop TV's fan favorite "Schitt & # 39; s Creek" won its first Emmy Award for casting in a comedy series on Thursday. But it's more than just the show's first Emmy, it can serve as an important barometer of how friendly voters are for the series in its final season.

At the Oscars it used to be that best editing was often a good indicator of which film would take home the best picture at the end of the evening. In the 1990s and 2000s, it was accurate 60 percent of the time, which is not great, but not terrible either. (In the 2010s the whole system went out of the window, only "Argo" (lol) was dubbed.)

In terms of TV comedies, the series that won the casting award won Best Comedy Series in the last five years ("Fleabag", "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel", "Veep", "Veep" and), "Veep"). According to this metric, while Schitt & # 39; s Creek is well positioned to take the crown home, as mentioned above, systems could have started and failed at any time. After all, "Modern Family" won the best comedy series five years in a row before "Veep", but only once the casting.

Schitt & # 39; s Creek

Oops

Screencap

Of course, Schitt & # 39; s Creek would probably have appreciated it if the TV academy had spelled the name of the show on Chyron announcing their victory correctly, but you can't win all of them.

Surprise: fixing in post

Speaking of tweaking things after the fact, the TV Academy has the honor of fixing a few issues some viewers had earlier in the week, including a misspelling in Wilford Brimley's name as well as the inclusion of a potentially controversial mask during a segment behind the scenes of "The Voice". Making mistakes happens, but fixing them is stupid.

Surprise: Kim Wexler Love

Congratulations to the extended family of AMC's Better Call Saul who won Emmy Awards for Outstanding Short Form Comedy or Drama Series for Better Call Saul Employee Training: Legal Ethics With Kim Wexler. The series is an adorable companion to their parenting show, which revolves around Kim Wexler (the incomparable Rhea Seehorn) and features delightfully animated illustrations of legal folly. It is great. Well earned everyone!

Snub: Rhea Seehorn's indifference

Are you kidding me?! Employee Training is great, but it would be a rarity if I didn't mention that the short form series that won an Emmy tonight is based on an achievement that has never been awarded an Emmy nomination.

Seehorn is a treasure and it makes no sense that voters don't see this and beyond that, even if the show only improves, the panel's interest in "Better Call Saul" as a whole seems to be waning.

I give up.

Big Mouth Season 1 Hormone Monstress

Surprise: Emmy winner Maya Rudolph

But it was really great to see "Saturday Night Live" win over alum and bubbly person Maya Rudolph for her language work on "Big Mouth". It's confusingly rare for the Emmys to get a category 100 percent right, but Rudolph is arguably the best voice actor on television right now, and the fact that she has been recognized as such is edifying.

Foam bath.

Wednesday 17th September

"The Maid's Tale"

Sophie Giraud / Hulu

It's hump day, so it's only appropriate that graduating from the Creative Arts Emmy program on Wednesday felt like some strain had been lifted. A few days ago we had four full webcasts ahead of the two weekend television events. Now the ceremony on Thursday is the only thing that stands between the audience and the weekend. Seldom has the passage of time felt more wondrous.

For those who have never personally attended the Creative Arts Emmy Awards, the Television Academy recently postponed the event to two separate nights over a single weekend, usually the weekend before the scheduled Primetime Emmy Awards. The press rooms were overcrowded and jockeying around outlet space could get nasty, but food was provided and the pace of the show was slow enough to allow brief makeovers about the room if needed.

Sitting and watching these events, which were manipulated in five separate presentations, took a lot of getting used to. Not only do I have to pay for my own food, there are far more cats living in my apartment than normally in the adjoining Microsoft Theater press room. Additionally, the pace of the webcasts was hectic and crowded at the same time, and there was barely enough time to sneeze unless it is in one of the many segments that have already been featured (sometimes multiple times) this week, at what point in time have enough time to kill.

In short, it's weird. Everyone tries their best, but it's still weird. Regardless, it wouldn't be the Emmys without a few snubs and surprises, and Wednesday had a lot going for it:

Surprise: Emmy Award-Winning Series "Vikings"

The mainstay of the history channel only has 10 episodes left before it ends. So it seems the series saved the best for last. Nominated 13 times since its debut in 2013, Vikings eventually broke its cold spell and won its first Emmy. The award in question was for outstanding supporting visual special effects and was presented for the sixth season finale entitled "The Best Laid Plans."

Fun Fact: Of the five nominees, only Hulus "The Handmaid & # 39; s Tale" has previously scored Emmy victories. Of the rest of the field, Prime Video's "Tom Ryan" has never won, "Tales From the Loop" only aired one season, and FX's "Devs" was a limited series.

The Crown Olivia Colman Season 3 Netflix

Olivia Colman in "The Crown"

Courtesy Des Willie / Netflix

Surprise: The costumes on "The Crown" are unstoppable

Three seasons, three Emmys. That's about as good as a show can expect when it comes to TV premiere consistency, and Netflix '"The Crown" did just that. There's just something about this royal family, and the show's continuous march through history to the present, that serves as catnip for costume lovers, and they're not wrong. You will have a hard time finding a luscious amount of wardrobes than the (developing) piece that proves fit for a queen even if they smell like the 1970s.

Surprise: "The Handmaid & # 39; s Tale" uses rules to defy math

Of course, if you want to get technical, there are absolutely chances that a series could get more awards in a category than they have in the season it can compete in, and I'm not talking about ties. Now, The Handmaid's Tale did just that in Outstanding Production Design For A Narrative Contemporary (an hour or more), taking home four trophies in that category, despite only airing three seasons.

It's a little in baseball, but the explanation goes like this: The Television Academy has a hanging episode rule that allows episodes to compete in categories the following year if they don't meet the Emmy Awards entry deadline for most of their season adhere to. That is, while most of the second season of "The Handmaid & # 39; s Tale" competed at the 2018 Emmy Awards, the last three episodes of the season were competing at the 2019 Emmy Awards.

The kid, AKA Baby Yoda, in "The Mandalorian".

Disney

Surprise: Disney + Looms Large

It's Baby Yoda to blame, but Disney + is clearly leading the way when it comes to the new generation of streamers. The streaming house of the mouse won five awards on Wednesday when "The Mandalorian" went five against ten that evening, a good performance for the freshman series. It's a surprising twist for a streaming platform that was originally seen as a place of populism rather than prestige, but time will tell if Mickey can make a name for himself on Sunday's primetime show.

Snub: We have to talk about "GLOW"

This seems like an equally good time to sit down and discuss the real-life impact of people who don't appreciate Netflix's "GLOW," a great comedy about an inclusive group of women banding together and being in bouncing around in the fabulous surroundings, the "Gorgeous" was Ladies of Wrestling. "While the series has consistently (deserved) a supporting actress nomination for Betty Gilpin and twice (super deserved) for her stunt coordination, it has fallen far short of the amount of praise and accolades it deserves.

Check out this show. There is a pandemic. I know you're running out of things. It's weird and fun and deeply touching, and if none of this works for you there are plenty of women in 1980s style leotards. It's coming back for another season and I better not be here again than to talk about how it didn't seem it took all of your time to be caught up with.

GLOW

"GLOW"

Erica Parise / Netflix

Surprise: reinventing repetitions.

Part of that unwavering sense of disinterest is likely due to the fact that while this was only the second night of the Creative Arts Emmy Awards, the ceremony was well advanced. Relatively early in the (47-minute) event, a section about the TV Academy's internship program ran. Or rather, it ran again, as repeated viewers saw it for the first time last night. It felt a little gauche, but when viewed as a form of internal advertising, it was largely harmless.

However, when the event repeated the exact same In Memoriam segment things got really angry.

During the ceremony on Monday night, the In Memoriam segment was a bit confusing. It consisted of a continuous crawl composed of the names of those in the industry who passed away in the past year, with only selected breakouts containing a person's name and photo and selected credits. It was unclear why certain people were preferred to others because of the diversity of their careers, but I was hoping the method of madness would be clarified in the nights that followed.

And it did. Because there is no method. Tuesday night's Memoriam was exactly the same, starting with Mythbusters star Grant Imahara, including drag performer and RuPaul & # 39; s Drag Race alumnus Chi Chi DeVayne, to Saturday Night Live music producer Hal Willner.

This seems obvious, but when you have a series of events over five different evenings there are many ways you can create a unique segment for each one that celebrates the lives and legacies of lost creators. There's little point in reusing the same clip, highlighting the same handful of people, and it's outrageous not to even spell check the names you include – even if they're stuck in the background.

Oh, I am sorry. Yeah, I wrote that about yesterday's show. Was this where you were hoping for original content from Wednesday's Emmy program? Me too. Don't spread your awards over four nights when you only have enough material for one.

Tuesday 15th September

Apollo 11

"Apollo 11"

CNN

Two more, three more. The Television Academy hosted the second night of their Creative Arts Emmy Awards on Tuesday, celebrating 16 categories of variety programs. Further episodes of the award ceremony are planned for Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday of this week.

Expectations for the night to celebrate the Variety program after the Monday night show, the organization's first attempt at celebrating a socially distant pseudo-ceremony, were (slightly) higher and left plenty of room for improvement. While the bobbles were relatively small – a presenter's hand was in full view during the self-recording, a two-time winner had their pre-recorded acceptance speech aired in sequence, the In Memoriam was confusing and possibly exclusive – they admitted that the entire production was like a cobblestone but easy to fix with a little editorial scrutiny.

As for the latest winners, there were very few snubs or surprises on paper. Perennial favorites like HBO's "Last Week Tonight With John Oliver" and NBC's "Saturday Night Live" ended the evening with three awards, while VH1's "RuPaul's Drag Race" received two more to complement the two starting Monday night , and a pair of ABC productions "The Oscars" and "Live in Front of a Studio Audience:" All in the Family "and" Good Times "" also won two trophies.

In truth, the real surprises on Tuesday night came not from the winners but from the production itself, never a promising prospect. So without further ado, here's the latest series of Emmy Surprises and Snubs for 2020:

Surprise: Somehow even shorter.

If you've watched the Emmy event on Monday night (you didn't) you know the entire affair took less than an hour and occurred in a cool 55 minutes. On Tuesday, the TV academy apparently decided to "keep my beer" by giving out 16 awards, acceptance speeches and everything in 47 minutes. I've been in a driveway at In-N-Out longer than this Emmy ceremony.

While there is something to be said about brevity, at some point it just feels like they're not taking the job of promoting the most prestigious awards on television seriously enough. And while I was willing to give the academy a great deal of relief because of the impossible situation they find themselves in – what about trying to run six events in seven days – there is no excuse for calling something that is very good as The climax could serve someone's professional career.

Nicole Byer nailed it to Netflix

Nicole Byer

Courtesy of Netflix

Surprise: reinventing repetitions.

Part of that unwavering sense of disinterest is likely due to the fact that while this was only the second night of the Creative Arts Emmy Awards, the ceremony was well advanced. Relatively early in the (47-minute) event, a section about the TV Academy's internship program ran. Or rather, it ran again, as repeated viewers saw it for the first time last night. It felt a little gauche, but when viewed as a form of internal advertising, it was largely harmless.

However, when the event repeated the exact same In Memoriam segment things got really angry.

During the ceremony on Monday night, the In Memoriam segment was a bit confusing. It consisted of a continuous crawl composed of the names of those in the industry who passed away in the past year, with only selected breakouts containing a person's name and photo and selected credits. It was unclear why certain people were preferred to others because of the diversity of their careers, but I was hoping the method of madness would be clarified in the nights that followed.

And it did. Because there is no method. Tuesday night's Memoriam was exactly the same, starting with Mythbusters star Grant Imahara, including drag performer and RuPaul & # 39; s Drag Race alumnus Chi Chi DeVayne, to Saturday Night Live music producer Hal Willner. (As a bonus, the segment also misspells the name Wilford Brimley.)

This seems obvious, but when you have a series of events over five different evenings there are many ways you can create a unique segment for each one that celebrates the lives and legacies of lost creators. There's little point in reusing the same clip, highlighting the same handful of people, and it's outrageous not to even spell check the names you include – even if they're stuck in the background.

Surprise: A thin blue line face mask

A "blink and you will miss it" was indicative of a somewhat controversial image on the mask of Emmy Award-winning director of "The Voice" Alan Carter.

While Carter gave the audience a (very interesting!) Look behind the scenes of the sprawling control room where the socially distant finale of the hit NBC chant series was filmed, he showed himself thoughtfully wearing a prescribed mask while inside a thin blue line Flag.

The images can be seen as problematic: as a symbol of solidarity with the police forces, the flag has since been co-opted by some white supremacists and used as an unofficial emblem of the “Blue Lives Matter” movement, suggesting that it is a person's career choice should be considered as sacrosanct as their race or gender for protection under the Hate Crime Act.

While police support is not inherently controversial, it is an odd decision by the Academy to include such questionable images in the editing while also going out of so much effort to reassure everyone that they are committed to the inclusion and the votes by people who are often marginalized in both countries empower industry and society at large. IndieWire reached out to the Television Academy for commentary on the recording of Carter's mask.

THE WALL - Season: 1 - Image: Chris Hardwick - (Photo: Chris Haston / NBC)

Chris Hardwick, "The Wall"

Chris Haston / NBC

Surprise: Chris Hardwick presents after # MeToo allegations

If you haven't seen Chris Hardwick lately, there is a reason for it. In 2018, Chloe Dykstra, an ex-girlfriend of the host's "Talking Dead," wrote a blog post accusing an unnamed ex of emotional and sexual abuse, in enough detail that readers found she was alleging Hardwick.

The Post opened an investigation into AMC, where Hardwick put on shows, and Nerdist, which he helped found. Ultimately, he was found innocent. Dykstra did not participate in either investigation.

Hardwick had to take a few weeks off before returning to his professional duties. Am Dienstag erhielt er den Eindruck der Branche, indem er bei den Creative Arts Emmys im Mittelpunkt stand, um die letzten beiden Auszeichnungen des Abends zu überreichen. IndieWire wandte sich an die Fernsehakademie, um einen Kommentar zu Hardwicks Auswahl zu erhalten.

Snub: "Eine Black Lady Sketch Show."

Als HBOs kleine Sketch-Comedy-Show, die die komödiantischen Talente von Robin Thede, Ashley Nicole Black, Gabrielle Dennis und Quinta Brunson zeigen könnte, konnte die brillante „A Black Lady Sketch Show“ den Goliath einfach nicht durchbrechen und stürzen ist "Saturday Night Live". Es ist in Ordnung, meine Damen. Ihr seid alle immer noch schlechte Hündinnen.

The Leftovers Staffel 3 Folge 7 Justin Theroux

Justin Theroux in "Die Reste"

Ben King / HBO

Überraschung: Der zweifache Emmy-Gewinner Justin Theroux.

Und zum Schluss noch ein paar gute Neuigkeiten. Es war nicht so, wie wir es erwartet hatten, aber Justin Theroux, der seine titanische Leistung in HBOs "The Leftovers" in jeder seiner drei Staffeln übersehen hatte – er wurde nicht einmal nominiert -, hat jetzt zwei Emmy Awards, alles dank Norman Lear. Theroux fungiert als ausführender Produzent der Live-Varieté-Specials und des neu entdeckten Emmy-Liebling „Live in a Studio Audience“ und wurde für seine Bemühungen rundweg belohnt.

Noch eine, Leute. Dann sind wir eben.

Montag, 14. September

"Tiger King: Mord, Chaos und Wahnsinn"

Netflix

Die Fernsehakademie führte wie kein anderer Montagabend eine Emmy-Zeremonie für kreative Künste ein, eine vorab aufgezeichnete Angelegenheit, die weniger als eine Stunde dauerte und 17 verschiedene Kategorien für Reality- und Sachbücher auszeichnete. Die Veranstaltung war die erste in einer einwöchigen Veranstaltung, bei der sozial distanzierte Zeremonien präsentiert wurden, die die Kunst des Fernsehens zelebrieren und gleichzeitig die Sicherheit und Vernunft angesichts der anhaltenden Pandemie fördern.

Und obwohl die Zeremonie selbst anders ausgesehen haben mag als in den Vorjahren, gab es offensichtliche Vorteile, einschließlich der Tatsache, dass das Publikum in diesem Jahr tatsächlich die Möglichkeit hat, jeden einzelnen Emmy zu sehen – etwas, das unter typischen Umständen, wo die Kreativen Künste nicht möglich sind, möglich ist Emmys würde über zwei Nächte in einer nicht im Fernsehen übertragenen Zeremonie mit einer gekürzten Version, die möglicherweise in einem Kabelnetz läuft, verteilt.

Was jedoch mit den Vorjahren identisch ist, sind die unvermeidlichen Snubs und Überraschungen, die mit der Bekanntgabe der Gewinner – und der nachfolgenden Verlierer – aufgedeckt werden. Wenn Sie eine vielbeschäftigte Person sind, die einfach keine Zeit für eine 56-minütige Zeremonie hat, finden Sie hier die sechs Snubs und Überraschungen nach der Veranstaltung am Montagabend:

Überraschung: Netflix ist König, "Tiger King" jedoch nicht.

Mit einem Rekord von 160 Emmy-Nominierungen in diesem Jahr ist es nicht verwunderlich, dass Netflix die erste Nacht des Wettbewerbs mit den meisten Siegen beendete. Was für manche jedoch ein Schock sein kann, ist die Tatsache, dass keiner der fünf Siege des Streamers aus seiner berüchtigten Dokumentarserie "Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness" stammt.

Der vielleicht erste Ausbruch der Quarantäne, "Tiger King", eroberte die Welt im Sturm, als die Zuschauer in ein unpassendes Netz aus exotischem Tierhorting, fehlenden Gliedmaßen und Mord zum Mieten hineingezogen wurden. Das Bestreben war so ein Erfolg, dass derzeit nicht ein, sondern zwei verschiedene Projekte in der Entwicklung sind, um die größere Erzählung „Tiger King“ in eine Serie mit Nicolas Cage bzw. Kate McKinnon umzuwandeln.

It appeared that Emmy voters were not immune to the off-kilter charms of the series, awarding it with six nominations, but as “Tiger King” went 0-for-3 on Monday, it seems like there might be a limit to the TV Academy’s love.

Instead, Netflix’s wins spanned a number of different offerings, including, “Queer Eye,” “American Factory,” “Don’t F*** With Cats,” and “Cheer.”

Surprise: David Attenborough Three-peat

When Emmy nominations were announced at the end of July, it was a delight to look at the nominees for Outstanding Narrator and witness a host of diverse voices, including stars of film and, uh, sport, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Angela Bassett, Lupita Nyong’o, and Chiwetel Ejiofor. Of course, those nominees were competing against a ringer in David Attenborough who, with his Monday victory for BBC America’s “Seven Worlds, One Planet,” has now won the category in three consecutive years.

In fact, many of Monday’s winners were whiter than a person might expect given the seemingly increased inclusiveness of the year’s nominees — to the extent that the ceremony itself had at least one segment dedicated to boosting underrepresented voices in the below the line fields that populate so much of the Creative Arts Emmys.

Apollo 11

“Apollo 11”

CNN

Surprise: Apollo, Apollo

It was just a really good night for projects with the word “Apollo” in the title, including CNN’s “Apollo 11,” which took home three awards, as well as HBO’s “The Apollo,” which won Outstanding Documentary or Non-Fiction Special.

Snub: “The Last Dance” Benched

Another documentary series that took the pandemic by storm, ESPN’s “The Last Dance” didn’t manage to clinch any victories at Monday’s ceremony. The series, which was pushed up two months in part due to audience demand, traced the final season of Michael Jordan’s tenure with the Chicago Bulls as they pursued a sixth NBA championship. Paired with the blanking of “Tiger King” and Michelle Obama’s “Becoming,” maybe voters found themselves put off by hype.

Snub: Beastie Bust

Similarly, Apple TV+’s much-touted documentary “Beastie Boys Story” went 0-for-5 at Monday’s ceremony, completing its Emmy journey almost before it began. But Apple TV+ wasn’t the only brand new player yet to strike first blood at the Emmys. Though nominated for far fewer awards for the first night of the Creative Arts Emmys, Disney+ also went home empty-handed, a disappointing launch for the streaming heavyweights.

Surprise: A Good Night for Network

Sure, Netflix was the outlet that scored the most awards on Monday, but it was also the only streamer to get any play at the ceremony. If Netflix won five awards, that means that 12 of the 17 prizes went to traditional network TV programs. While it can often seem as though streaming television is the primary place to turn for TV these days, networks including NatGeo, CNN, VH1, and others prove that your computer isn’t the only choice for getting quality programming, particularly if that programming is non-fiction.

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